Ultimas Noticias!

26 Jun 2014

youmightfindyourself:

By: Oyl Miller, McSweeney’s

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by brevity, over-connectedness, emotionally starving for attention, dragging themselves through virtual communities at 3 am, surrounded by stale pizza and neglected dreams, looking for angry meaning, any meaning, same hat wearing hipsters burning for shared and skeptical approval from the holographic projected dynamo in the technology of the era, who weak connections and recession wounded and directionless, sat up, micro-conversing in the supernatural darkness of Wi-Fi-enabled cafes, floating across the tops of cities, contemplating techno, who bared their brains to the black void of new media and the thought leaders and so called experts who passed through community colleges with radiant, prank playing eyes, hallucinating Seattle- and Tarantino-like settings among pop scholars of war and change, who dropped out in favor of following a creative muse, publishing zines and obscene artworks on the windows of the internet, who cowered in unshaven rooms, in ironic superman underwear burning their money in wastebaskets from the 1980s and listening to Nirvana through paper thin walls, who got busted in their grungy beards riding the Metro through Shinjuku station, who ate digital in painted hotels or drank Elmer’s glue in secret alleyways, death or purgatoried their torsos with tattoos taking the place of dreams, that turned into nightmares, because there are no dreams in the New Immediacy, incomparably blind to reality, inventing the new reality, through hollow creations fed through illuminated screens. Screens of shuttering tag clouds and image thumbnails lightning in the mind surfing towards Boards of Canada and Guevara, illuminating all the frozen matrices of time between, megabyted solidities of borders and yesterday’s backyard wiffleball dawns, downloaded drunkenness over rooftops, digital storefronts of flickering flash, a sun and moon of programming joyrides sending vibrations to mobile devices set on manner mode during twittering wintering dusks of Peduca, ashtray rantings and coffee stains that hid the mind, who bound themselves to wireless devices for an endless ride of opiated information from CNN.com and Google on sugary highs until the noise of modems and fax machines brought them down shuddering, with limited and vulgar verbiage to comment threads, battered bleak of shared brain devoid of brilliance in the drear light of a monitor, who sank all night in interface’s light of Pabst floated out and sat through the stale sake afternoon in desolate pizza parlors, listening to the crack of doom on separate nuclear iPods, who texted continuously 140 characters at a time from park to pond to bar to MOMA to Brooklyn Bridge lost battalion of platonic laconic self proclaimed journalists committed to a revolution of information, jumping down the stoops off of R&B album covers out of the late 1980s, tweeting their screaming vomiting whispering facts and advices and anecdotes of lunchtime sandwiches and cat antics on couches with eyeballs following and shockwaves of analytics and of authority and finding your passion and other jargon, whole intellects underscored and wiped clean in the total recall 24/7 365 assault all under the gaze of once brilliant eyes.

21 May 2014

19 May 2014

Partner in crime #indiefilm

Partner in crime #indiefilm

5 Feb 2014

“The woman who doesn’t need validation from anyone is the most feared individual on the planet.”
Mohadesa Najumi (via aestheticintrovert)

(Source: nyu-tah)

29 Jan 2014

a-bittersweet-life:

The Tree of Life, directed by Terrence Malick, featuring Jessica Chastain, Brad Pitt, and Sean Penn.

(Source: in-love-with-movies)

9 Jan 2014

a-bittersweet-life:

Films of 2014: Week 1

24 Oct 2013

"I am tired of the cult of youth. The cultural rejection of old age, the stigmatization of wrinkles, grey hair, of bodies furrowed by the years. I am fascinated by Diana Vreeland, Georgia O’Keeffe and Louise Bourgeois, women who have let time embrace them without ever cheating. Society today condems this, me, I celebrate it. For this session of fine jewellery, I imagined a man and a woman who had been together for a long time, faithful to each other and always incandescent with desire."

TOM FORD

23 Jun 2013

cinephilearchive:

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history… Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on Citizen Kane (3:29 — 6:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary. With Ernest Lehman (13:10, 20:13, 23:34, Robert Mitchum, Julie Andrews and more…



After editing Kane, Wise quickly turned to directing starting with Val Lewton’s classic B-movie The Curse of the Cat People (1944) and moving up to The Body Snatcher (1945), The Set-Up (1949), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), West Side Story (1961), The Haunting (1963), The Sound of Music (1965) and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), collecting four Oscars out of seven nominations in the process.





In 1941, Wise had recently graduated from an apprentice editorship to a full-time editor, having cut Dorothy Arzner’s Dance, Girl, Dance and William Dieterle’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame before he interviewed for the job on Citizen Kane. The film’s studio, RKO, had already assigned an older editor to the picture, but Welles fired him and hired Wise, who was just 6 months older than the 25 year-old director.





“I worked with him like I did with any director in those days,” said Wise recently via telephone from his Los Angeles home. “When he shot all the angles in a sequence, I would put it in a cut and then I would show it to him and he would say, ‘don’t use that close up,’ or ‘why didn’t you use those over-the-shoulders I shot?’”





Wise’s 60-year memories of the film have faded slightly, but he does remember assembling the famous “breakfast” sequence, where he inserted “whip-pans” between the scenes to make the time seem like it was flying by. “The concept was there, and Orson shot it, but the feeling of it, the pacing of it, the rhythm of it was done in the editing,” he says.





Wise also takes credit for the look of the “News on the March” newsreel sequence. As he combined new footage of Welles as Kane with old stock footage from the RKO vaults, he realized he needed to match the new footage with the scratched-up old footage. Wise’s secret? Rubbing the film through cheesecloth filled with sand. Though Wise acknowledges these innovations, he also blames himself for the film’s biggest flub, which is that no character actually hears Kane say his famous last word, “Rosebud.” “That was probably my fault,” he laughs. As for the film’s subsequent reception, Wise says “I don’t single out any one film as the greatest film of all time, but it’s certainly one of the greatest.” —Getting Wise, Interview with Robert Wise



With thanks to LoSceicco1976
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cinephilearchive:

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history… Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on Citizen Kane (3:296:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary. With Ernest Lehman (13:10, 20:13, 23:34, Robert Mitchum, Julie Andrews and more…

After editing Kane, Wise quickly turned to directing starting with Val Lewton’s classic B-movie The Curse of the Cat People (1944) and moving up to The Body Snatcher (1945), The Set-Up (1949), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), West Side Story (1961), The Haunting (1963), The Sound of Music (1965) and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), collecting four Oscars out of seven nominations in the process.

In 1941, Wise had recently graduated from an apprentice editorship to a full-time editor, having cut Dorothy Arzner’s Dance, Girl, Dance and William Dieterle’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame before he interviewed for the job on Citizen Kane. The film’s studio, RKO, had already assigned an older editor to the picture, but Welles fired him and hired Wise, who was just 6 months older than the 25 year-old director.

“I worked with him like I did with any director in those days,” said Wise recently via telephone from his Los Angeles home. “When he shot all the angles in a sequence, I would put it in a cut and then I would show it to him and he would say, ‘don’t use that close up,’ or ‘why didn’t you use those over-the-shoulders I shot?’”

Wise’s 60-year memories of the film have faded slightly, but he does remember assembling the famous “breakfast” sequence, where he inserted “whip-pans” between the scenes to make the time seem like it was flying by. “The concept was there, and Orson shot it, but the feeling of it, the pacing of it, the rhythm of it was done in the editing,” he says.

Wise also takes credit for the look of the “News on the March” newsreel sequence. As he combined new footage of Welles as Kane with old stock footage from the RKO vaults, he realized he needed to match the new footage with the scratched-up old footage. Wise’s secret? Rubbing the film through cheesecloth filled with sand. Though Wise acknowledges these innovations, he also blames himself for the film’s biggest flub, which is that no character actually hears Kane say his famous last word, “Rosebud.” “That was probably my fault,” he laughs. As for the film’s subsequent reception, Wise says “I don’t single out any one film as the greatest film of all time, but it’s certainly one of the greatest.” —Getting Wise, Interview with Robert Wise

image

With thanks to LoSceicco1976

27 Aug 2012

(Source: inirvanayou)

7 Nov 2011

19 Oct 2011

bohemea:

I am the 99%.

(Not always a good thing)

bohemea:

I am the 99%.

(Not always a good thing)

27 Sep 2011

21 Sep 2011

Wow:

Deep in the rainforests of the Indian state of Meghalaya, bridges are not built, they’re grown. For more than 500 years locals have guided roots and vines from the native Ficus Elastica (rubber tree) across rivers, using hollowed out trees to create root guidance systems. When the roots and vines reach the opposite bank they are allowed to take root. Some of the bridges are over 100 feet long and can support the weight of 50 people.

15 Sep 2011

suicideblonde:

The library in the Maison de Verre in Paris

suicideblonde:

The library in the Maison de Verre in Paris

7 Sep 2011

youmightfindyourself:

“Time” is the most used noun in the English language, yet it remains a mystery. We’ve just completed an amazingly intense and rewarding multidisciplinary conference on the nature of time, and my brain is swimming with ideas and new questions. Rather than trying a summary (the talks will be online soon), here’s my stab at a top ten list partly inspired by our discussions: the things everyone should know about time. [Update: all of these are things I think are true, after quite a bit of deliberation. Not everyone agrees, although of course they should.]

1. Time exists. Might as well get this common question out of the way. Of course time exists — otherwise how would we set our alarm clocks? Time organizes the universe into an ordered series of moments, and thank goodness; what a mess it would be if reality were complete different from moment to moment. The real question is whether or not time is fundamental, or perhaps emergent. We used to think that “temperature” was a basic category of nature, but now we know it emerges from the motion of atoms. When it comes to whether time is fundamental, the answer is: nobody knows. My bet is “yes,” but we’ll need to understand quantum gravity much better before we can say for sure.

2. The past and future are equally real. This isn’t completely accepted, but it should be. Intuitively we think that the “now” is real, while the past is fixed and in the books, and the future hasn’t yet occurred. But physics teaches us something remarkable: every event in the past and future is implicit in the current moment. This is hard to see in our everyday lives, since we’re nowhere close to knowing everything about the universe at any moment, nor will we ever be — but the equations don’t lie. As Einstein put it, “It appears therefore more natural to think of physical reality as a four dimensional existence, instead of, as hitherto, the evolution of a three dimensional existence.”

3. Everyone experiences time differently. This is true at the level of both physics and biology. Within physics, we used to have Sir Isaac Newton’s view of time, which was universal and shared by everyone. But then Einstein came along and explained that how much time elapses for a person depends on how they travel through space (especially near the speed of light) as well as the gravitational field (especially if its near a black hole). From a biological or psychological perspective, the time measured by atomic clocks isn’t as important as the time measured by our internal rhythms and the accumulation of memories. That happens differently depending on who we are and what we are experiencing; there’s a real sense in which time moves more quickly when we’re older.

4. You live in the past. About 80 milliseconds in the past, to be precise. Use one hand to touch your nose, and the other to touch one of your feet, at exactly the same time. You will experience them as simultaneous acts. But that’s mysterious — clearly it takes more time for the signal to travel up your nerves from your feet to your brain than from your nose. The reconciliation is simple: our conscious experience takes time to assemble, and your brain waits for all the relevant input before it experiences the “now.” Experiments have shown that the lag between things happening and us experiencing them is about 80 milliseconds. (Via conference participant David Eagleman.)

5. Your memory isn’t as good as you think.  When you remember an event in the past, your brain uses a very similar technique to imagining the future. The process is less like “replaying a video” than “putting on a play from a script.” If the script is wrong for whatever reason, you can have a false memory that is just as vivid as a true one. Eyewitness testimony, it turns out, is one of the least reliable forms of evidence allowed into courtrooms. (Via conference participants Kathleen McDermott and Henry Roediger.)

6. Consciousness depends on manipulating time. Many cognitive abilities are important for consciousness, and we don’t yet have a complete picture. But it’s clear that the ability to manipulate time and possibility is a crucial feature. In contrast to aquatic life, land-based animals, whose vision-based sensory field extends for hundreds of meters, have time to contemplate a variety of actions and pick the best one. The origin of grammar allowed us to talk about such hypothetical futures with each other. Consciousness wouldn’t be possible without the ability to imagine other times. (Via conference participant Malcolm MacIver.)

7. Disorder increases as time passes. At the heart of every difference between the past and future — memory, aging, causality, free will — is the fact that the universe is evolving from order to disorder. Entropy is increasing, as we physicists say. There are more ways to be disorderly (high entropy) than orderly (low entropy), so the increase of entropy seems natural. But to explain the lower entropy of past times we need to go all the way back to the Big Bang. We still haven’t answered the hard questions: why was entropy low near the Big Bang, and how does increasing entropy account for memory and causality and all the rest? (We heard great talks by David Albert and David Wallace, among others.)

8. Complexity comes and goes. Other than creationists, most people have no trouble appreciating the difference between “orderly” (low entropy) and “complex.” Entropy increases, but complexity is ephemeral; it increases and decreases in complex ways, unsurprisingly enough. Part of the “job” of complex structures is to increase entropy, e.g. in the origin of life. But we’re far from having a complete understanding of this crucial phenomenon. (Talks by Mike RussellRichard LenskiRaissa D’Souza.)

9. Aging can be reversed. We all grow old, part of the general trend toward growing disorder. But it’s only the universe as a whole that must increase in entropy, not every individual piece of it. (Otherwise it would be impossible to build a refrigerator.) Reversing the arrow of time for living organisms is a technological challenge, not a physical impossibility. And we’re making progress on a few fronts: stem cellsyeast, and even (with caveats) mice and human muscle tissue. As one biologist told me: “You and I won’t live forever. But as for our grandkids, I’m not placing any bets.”

10. A lifespan is a billion heartbeats. Complex organisms die. Sad though it is in individual cases, it’s a necessary part of the bigger picture; life pushes out the old to make way for the new. Remarkably, there exist simple scaling laws relating animal metabolism to body mass. Larger animals live longer; but they also metabolize slower, as manifested in slower heart rates. These effects cancel out, so that animals from shrews to blue whales have lifespans with just about equal number of heartbeats — about one and a half billion, if you simply must be precise. In that very real sense, all animal species experience “the same amount of time.” At least, until we master #9 and become immortal. (Amazing talk by Geoffrey West.)