Ultimas Noticias!

29 Sep 2014

26 Aug 2014

cinema-snaps:

Home is behind, the world ahead… And there are many paths to tread. Through shadow, to the edge of night, until the stars are all alight… Mist and shadow, cloud and shade, all shall fade… all… shall… fade…

22 Aug 2014

(Source: sandandglass)

19 Aug 2014

cinephiliabeyond:

The story goes like this: young filmmaker Colin Levy wrote to his hero Martin Scorsese several years ago, asking which films he should see in order to broaden his cinematic horizons. Scorsese’s assistant sent over a list of 39 foreign films that the director had personally recommended, along with the following note: “Mr. Scorsese asked that I sent this your way. This should be a jump start to your film education!” Thanks to Bleeding Cool & Andrew Erdle.
Here’s an A-Z list of the films that mattered to Scorsese.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

The story goes like this: young filmmaker Colin Levy wrote to his hero Martin Scorsese several years ago, asking which films he should see in order to broaden his cinematic horizons. Scorsese’s assistant sent over a list of 39 foreign films that the director had personally recommended, along with the following note: “Mr. Scorsese asked that I sent this your way. This should be a jump start to your film education!” Thanks to Bleeding Cool & Andrew Erdle.

Here’s an A-Z list of the films that mattered to Scorsese.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

10 Aug 2014

virginwhoreofbabylon:

Jane Asher/Deep End

virginwhoreofbabylon:

Jane Asher/Deep End

10 Aug 2014

cinema-snaps:

"Argo fuck yourself."

Tony Mendez, John Chambers, Lester Siegel | Argo (2012)

26 Jun 2014

youmightfindyourself:

By: Oyl Miller, McSweeney’s

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by brevity, over-connectedness, emotionally starving for attention, dragging themselves through virtual communities at 3 am, surrounded by stale pizza and neglected dreams, looking for angry meaning, any meaning, same hat wearing hipsters burning for shared and skeptical approval from the holographic projected dynamo in the technology of the era, who weak connections and recession wounded and directionless, sat up, micro-conversing in the supernatural darkness of Wi-Fi-enabled cafes, floating across the tops of cities, contemplating techno, who bared their brains to the black void of new media and the thought leaders and so called experts who passed through community colleges with radiant, prank playing eyes, hallucinating Seattle- and Tarantino-like settings among pop scholars of war and change, who dropped out in favor of following a creative muse, publishing zines and obscene artworks on the windows of the internet, who cowered in unshaven rooms, in ironic superman underwear burning their money in wastebaskets from the 1980s and listening to Nirvana through paper thin walls, who got busted in their grungy beards riding the Metro through Shinjuku station, who ate digital in painted hotels or drank Elmer’s glue in secret alleyways, death or purgatoried their torsos with tattoos taking the place of dreams, that turned into nightmares, because there are no dreams in the New Immediacy, incomparably blind to reality, inventing the new reality, through hollow creations fed through illuminated screens. Screens of shuttering tag clouds and image thumbnails lightning in the mind surfing towards Boards of Canada and Guevara, illuminating all the frozen matrices of time between, megabyted solidities of borders and yesterday’s backyard wiffleball dawns, downloaded drunkenness over rooftops, digital storefronts of flickering flash, a sun and moon of programming joyrides sending vibrations to mobile devices set on manner mode during twittering wintering dusks of Peduca, ashtray rantings and coffee stains that hid the mind, who bound themselves to wireless devices for an endless ride of opiated information from CNN.com and Google on sugary highs until the noise of modems and fax machines brought them down shuddering, with limited and vulgar verbiage to comment threads, battered bleak of shared brain devoid of brilliance in the drear light of a monitor, who sank all night in interface’s light of Pabst floated out and sat through the stale sake afternoon in desolate pizza parlors, listening to the crack of doom on separate nuclear iPods, who texted continuously 140 characters at a time from park to pond to bar to MOMA to Brooklyn Bridge lost battalion of platonic laconic self proclaimed journalists committed to a revolution of information, jumping down the stoops off of R&B album covers out of the late 1980s, tweeting their screaming vomiting whispering facts and advices and anecdotes of lunchtime sandwiches and cat antics on couches with eyeballs following and shockwaves of analytics and of authority and finding your passion and other jargon, whole intellects underscored and wiped clean in the total recall 24/7 365 assault all under the gaze of once brilliant eyes.

21 May 2014

19 May 2014

Partner in crime #indiefilm

Partner in crime #indiefilm

5 Feb 2014

“The woman who doesn’t need validation from anyone is the most feared individual on the planet.”
Mohadesa Najumi (via aestheticintrovert)

(Source: nyu-tah)

29 Jan 2014

a-bittersweet-life:

The Tree of Life, directed by Terrence Malick, featuring Jessica Chastain, Brad Pitt, and Sean Penn.

(Source: in-love-with-movies)

9 Jan 2014

a-bittersweet-life:

Films of 2014: Week 1

24 Oct 2013

"I am tired of the cult of youth. The cultural rejection of old age, the stigmatization of wrinkles, grey hair, of bodies furrowed by the years. I am fascinated by Diana Vreeland, Georgia O’Keeffe and Louise Bourgeois, women who have let time embrace them without ever cheating. Society today condems this, me, I celebrate it. For this session of fine jewellery, I imagined a man and a woman who had been together for a long time, faithful to each other and always incandescent with desire."

TOM FORD

23 Jun 2013

cinephilearchive:

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history… Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on Citizen Kane (3:29 — 6:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary. With Ernest Lehman (13:10, 20:13, 23:34, Robert Mitchum, Julie Andrews and more…



After editing Kane, Wise quickly turned to directing starting with Val Lewton’s classic B-movie The Curse of the Cat People (1944) and moving up to The Body Snatcher (1945), The Set-Up (1949), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), West Side Story (1961), The Haunting (1963), The Sound of Music (1965) and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), collecting four Oscars out of seven nominations in the process.





In 1941, Wise had recently graduated from an apprentice editorship to a full-time editor, having cut Dorothy Arzner’s Dance, Girl, Dance and William Dieterle’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame before he interviewed for the job on Citizen Kane. The film’s studio, RKO, had already assigned an older editor to the picture, but Welles fired him and hired Wise, who was just 6 months older than the 25 year-old director.





“I worked with him like I did with any director in those days,” said Wise recently via telephone from his Los Angeles home. “When he shot all the angles in a sequence, I would put it in a cut and then I would show it to him and he would say, ‘don’t use that close up,’ or ‘why didn’t you use those over-the-shoulders I shot?’”





Wise’s 60-year memories of the film have faded slightly, but he does remember assembling the famous “breakfast” sequence, where he inserted “whip-pans” between the scenes to make the time seem like it was flying by. “The concept was there, and Orson shot it, but the feeling of it, the pacing of it, the rhythm of it was done in the editing,” he says.





Wise also takes credit for the look of the “News on the March” newsreel sequence. As he combined new footage of Welles as Kane with old stock footage from the RKO vaults, he realized he needed to match the new footage with the scratched-up old footage. Wise’s secret? Rubbing the film through cheesecloth filled with sand. Though Wise acknowledges these innovations, he also blames himself for the film’s biggest flub, which is that no character actually hears Kane say his famous last word, “Rosebud.” “That was probably my fault,” he laughs. As for the film’s subsequent reception, Wise says “I don’t single out any one film as the greatest film of all time, but it’s certainly one of the greatest.” —Getting Wise, Interview with Robert Wise



With thanks to LoSceicco1976
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cinephilearchive:

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history… Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on Citizen Kane (3:296:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary. With Ernest Lehman (13:10, 20:13, 23:34, Robert Mitchum, Julie Andrews and more…

After editing Kane, Wise quickly turned to directing starting with Val Lewton’s classic B-movie The Curse of the Cat People (1944) and moving up to The Body Snatcher (1945), The Set-Up (1949), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), West Side Story (1961), The Haunting (1963), The Sound of Music (1965) and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), collecting four Oscars out of seven nominations in the process.

In 1941, Wise had recently graduated from an apprentice editorship to a full-time editor, having cut Dorothy Arzner’s Dance, Girl, Dance and William Dieterle’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame before he interviewed for the job on Citizen Kane. The film’s studio, RKO, had already assigned an older editor to the picture, but Welles fired him and hired Wise, who was just 6 months older than the 25 year-old director.

“I worked with him like I did with any director in those days,” said Wise recently via telephone from his Los Angeles home. “When he shot all the angles in a sequence, I would put it in a cut and then I would show it to him and he would say, ‘don’t use that close up,’ or ‘why didn’t you use those over-the-shoulders I shot?’”

Wise’s 60-year memories of the film have faded slightly, but he does remember assembling the famous “breakfast” sequence, where he inserted “whip-pans” between the scenes to make the time seem like it was flying by. “The concept was there, and Orson shot it, but the feeling of it, the pacing of it, the rhythm of it was done in the editing,” he says.

Wise also takes credit for the look of the “News on the March” newsreel sequence. As he combined new footage of Welles as Kane with old stock footage from the RKO vaults, he realized he needed to match the new footage with the scratched-up old footage. Wise’s secret? Rubbing the film through cheesecloth filled with sand. Though Wise acknowledges these innovations, he also blames himself for the film’s biggest flub, which is that no character actually hears Kane say his famous last word, “Rosebud.” “That was probably my fault,” he laughs. As for the film’s subsequent reception, Wise says “I don’t single out any one film as the greatest film of all time, but it’s certainly one of the greatest.” —Getting Wise, Interview with Robert Wise

image

With thanks to LoSceicco1976

27 Aug 2012

(Source: inirvanayou)